Informatik, TU Wien

Talk: How Collective Behaviour opens new perspectives in the visualization of time and space

The Centre for Visual Analytics Science and Technology invites to a talk of Juri Buchmüller, University of Konstanz, Germany

Abstract


What do cells in biological tissues, fish schools moving in perfect synchrony, or migrating storks have in common? All of them express Collective Behaviour. While subject of intense research, many of the coordination mechanisms of groups and swarms have not yet been fully understood. Information Visualization and Visual Analytics approaches are needed to solve the tasks in this domain. At the same time, the very special nature of group movements strains our traditional understanding of spatiotemporal data analysis and calls for a paradigm shift. In my talk, I will give an overview of these challenges and outline gaps which require creative new approaches to deal with the fascinating world of Collective Behaviour.


Speaker biography


Juri Buchmüller is a senior Ph.D. student at the Data Analysis and Visualization group of Prof. Dr. Daniel Keim at the University of Konstanz, Germany. Since his Master studies on the analysis of flight traffic patterns, his fascination with moving objects and spatiotemporal data is unbroken. Currently, his work concentrates on the visualization of group movements, where he is part of the university's initiative to establish Collective Behavior research as inter-disciplinary centre of excellence. He is in close collaboration with domain experts from biology and sociology and involved in data analysis and visualization efforts of project ICARUS, lead by Prof. Dr. Martin Wikelski, tracking thousands of animals globally using the International Space Station. His research focuses on the development of non-traditional representations and approaches for geospatial and spatiotemporal datasets.

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For more information: https://www.cvast.tuwien.ac.at/news/2019-02/invited-talk-juri-buchmuller-university-konstanz-how-collective-behaviour-opens-new-1