Informatik, TU Wien

Opening of the Vienna Center for Logic and Algorithms

Five invited speakers including Turing Award winner Edmund M. Clarke will speak at the opening event of the Vienna Center for Logic and Algorithms. On the following day, in recognition of his contributions to logic in computer science, TU Vienna will award an Honorary Doctorate to Prof. Clarke.

The Vienna Center for Logic and Algorithms is an initiative of the Faculty of Informatics and funded by a three-year competitive grant of Vienna University of Technology. Embedded into the primary research area Computational Intelligence and the funding priority Computational Logic of the Faculty, the center is promoting international scientific collaboration in logic and algorithms.

Wednesday, 25th January 2012 - Festsaal, 1st Floor
Symposium “Logic and Algorithms: A Scientific Perspective“

09:00 Welcome
         Stefan Szeider and Helmut Veith, VCLA, Co-chairs, TU Vienna

         Formal Specification and Verification of Markovian Population Models
         Thomas A. Henzinger, IST Austria

10:00 Coffee break

10:30 Kernelization Algorithms
         Fedor V. Fomin, University of Bergen

         Battling Bugs with Interpolants
         Georg Weissenbacher, Princeton University

12:00 Lunch break

13:00 Practical Algorithms for Minimal Unsatisfiable Core Extraction
         Joao Marques-Silva, University College Dublin & IST/INESC-ID

         30 Years of Model Checking
         Edmund M. Clarke, Carnegie Mellon University

14:30 Coffee break

Official Opening of the VCLA

15:00 Sabine Seidler, Rector of the TU Vienna
         Gerald Steinhardt, Dean of the Faculty of Informatics, TU Vienna
         Stefan Szeider and Helmut Veith, VCLA, Co-chairs, TU Vienna

Thursday, 26th January 2012 - Boecklsaal, 1st Floor
Award of the Honorary Doctorate

10:00 Award of the Honorary Doctorate to
         Edmund M. Clarke, Carnegie Mellon University

Edmund M. Clarke is among the leading computer scientists of our times. As a professor at Harvard, and, since 1982, at Carnegie Mellon University, he and his group have not only laid the theoretical and logical foundations of model checking (ACM Turing Award, 2007), but also pioneered model checking as a powerful tool for industrial hardware and software engineering.