Informatics, TU Vienna

Socially-Aware Interfaces for Supporting Co-located Interactions

One of the important challenges in ubiquitous computing is to improve the technology’s access to information available in the social context.

Abstract

One of the important challenges in ubiquitous computing is to improve the technology’s access to information available in the social context. My doctoral research focuses on how to design interfaces that support co-located multi-user interactions taking into account individual and group nonverbal behavior such as proxemics, gaze direction and body movements. In particular, the research activities are twofold: to understand which nonverbal cues and social signals reflect engagement, cooperation and cohesion in co-located group activities and to design systems that can handle and manage this social information.

In this talk, I will present an integrated research approach for designing multi-user interactions based on social signal processing and I will discuss the progress-to-date toward the development of systems that can sense and respond to social context.

Biography

Gianluca Schiavo is currently working on a PhD in Cognitive Science at University of Trento (Italy) and FBK - Fondazione Bruno Kessler (i3 - Intelligent Interfaces & interaction Research Unit). He holds an M.Sc. in Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Sciences from the University of Padova (Italy). As cognitive scientist and HCI researcher, Gianluca is interested in the psychological and cognitive aspects of the interaction between human(s) and technology, with an emphasis on study co-located interactions of groups with technologies such as interactive tabletops and public displays. In his PhD research, he is exploring the role of nonverbal behavior in human-computer as well in human-human interactions to investigate how multi-user systems can be designed to leverage this information.

Note

This lecture is organized by the Human Computer Interaction Group at the Institute of Design and Assessment of Technology.
The informal meeting offers people the possibility to exchange scientific thoughts, questions and know-how. Everyone is welcome to attend the meeting and to bring along his/her own lunch.