Informatics, TU Vienna

Overview of HITLab NZ projects and understanding spatial relations with virtual characters

The first part of the talk will address an overview about HITLab NZ and its recent projects, such as the recent Mobile Augmented Reality application that helps in visualizing buildings that were destroyed in the recent 7.1 and 6.3 magnitude earthquakes in Christchurch.

Abstract

The first part of the talk will address an overview about HITLab NZ and its recent projects, such as the recent Mobile Augmented Reality application that helps in visualizing buildings that were destroyed in the recent 7.1 and 6.3 magnitude earthquakes in Christchurch. The second part of the talk will focus on my recent work on understanding the users perception of virtual agents that are embedded in real and virtual worlds. In particular, I will talk about the perception of spatial relations and how we used the user’s voice compensation as a measure to show that people speak louder when they believe that are distant from the virtual agent.

Biography

Mohammad Obaid completed his Bachelors and Masters degree at the Computer Science and Software Engineering Department at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, in which he gained First Class Honours for his Masters degree. His Masters' research project focused on the area of Non-Photorealistic Rendering, where he developed an algorithm for Automatic Painterly Rendering applications. Mohammad Obaid, recently, completed his Ph.D. degree at the HITLab New Zealand, University of Canterbury. His PhD research focus was on the area of Facial Expression Representations using Generic Mathematical Models.

He published work on a novel idea in representing facial expressions using quadratic deformation models. The new way of representing expressions has proven to be useful in domain areas such as affective computing and electronic entertainment. Mohammad Obaid's research interests include the following: Facial Expressions Representations and Analysis, 3D Virtual Characters, 3D Computer Graphics and Animation, Image Processing, Non-Photorealistic Rendering, Human-Computer Interaction, and Affective Computing. More recently, his research focus is put towards understanding the user’s perceptual experience when interacting with expressive AR-based agents.

Note

This lecture is organized by the Computer Graphics Group at the Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms. Supported by the Austrian Computer Society (OCG).